The Weird Winter of 2016-17

Temperatures in the Great Lakes region are unusually warm. That has a broad impact – from Lake Effect storms to ferry schedules to fish spawning. 

Ways to Connect

Dave Rosenthal

A new report sums up the crazy winter that brought unusually warm temperatures to the Great Lakes region -- as well as some brutal Lake Effect snowstorms.

Toronto recorded its highest February temperature -- 66 degrees -- on Feb. 23, according to the Midwestern Regional Climate Center. The following day, more records were set in Syracuse (71), Binghamton, N.Y. (70), and Erie, Pa., (77).

(Left) Jason Wulf and Erik Bernardi owners of Lake Effect Artisan Ice Cream in Lockport

What’s in a name? Turns out, a whole lot.

It’s how Buffalo's Lake Effect Furies stand out from the crowd.

At first the group was called the “Queen City Roller Girls All Star Team.”

"But that didn’t have a lot of personality to it," said Michael Thomas, one of two team captains.


John Kucko

A little house on the shore of Lake Ontario is gaining national attention.

After being pummeled with water, cold air and high winds, portions of the house that face the lake are  covered in thick layers of ice.

Saranac Lake Volunteer Fire Department / Ice rescue practice

First of two parts

Snowmobiling is a popular sport on New Hampshire’s Lake Potanipo. Riders like the wide open spaces. It isn’t unusual to see them set up makeshift roads and racetracks and zoom around the ice.

Snowmobile enthusiast Chris DeJoy says it’s all good fun, but you have use caution. ​“I think a lot of people jump on a snowmobile don’t realize how dangerous it can be."

This winter the lakes have been especially dangerous.

Veronica Volk / Great Lakes Today

Second of two parts

Unstable ice has been a factor in the deaths of more than 30 people across the northeast and Great Lakes region this winter. One of those tragedies took place last month on Conesus Lake, N.Y. 


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