Pollution

Decades of industrial use degraded much of the Great Lakes' shoreline and waters. In recent years, stricter regulation and ambitious cleanup campaigns have reversed that neglect, but agricultural runoff remains a serious problem.

Ways to Connect

President-elect Donald Trump's transition team is busy filling some 4,000 jobs in his new administration. For folks who are interested in the Great Lakes, three of those appointees are particularly important.

The U.S. has three seats on the six-member International Joint Commission, which works with the U.S. and Canada in regulating the lakes and other boundary waters. 

WBFO file

A $500,000 fine in a federal consent decree is the latest environmental penalty for a Pennsylvania coke company based on the Lake Erie shoreline.

And the fine -- which mirrors penalties at a sister plant near Buffalo -- is the latest reminder of the toxic industrial legacy of the Great Lakes.

NASA

 

An analysis out this week from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reports that algae blooms were "fewer, less dense, and less toxic" this year than in 2014 or 2015.

That's good news for the region, because the blooms can cause sickness in people and animals. They also can create problems in treating drinking water.

Angelica Morrison

Advocates for the Great Lakes are watching the presidential election and hoping the next U.S. president will continue to prioritize restoration across the region.

 


by Veronica Volk

A program to fund restoration and remediation projects in the Great Lakes region has an uncertain future.

A cove on the South Shore of Lake Ontario near Rochester, New York called Buck Pond is undergoing a transformation.

Brad Mudrzynski is a graduate student with the College at Brockport and is working on a habitat restoration project here.

"One of the focus points of this project is to create northern pike spawning habitat," he says.

Pages