Lake Erie

Erie is the shallowest of the Great Lakes, with an average depth of 62 feet. It is 241 miles long and 57 miles wide.

Ways to Connect

WBFO News

It began as a gimmick: a towering rubber duckie that promised to lure people to waterfront festivals around the world.

The cute, yellow giant has drawn thousands in places like Hong Kong and Taiwan. But now the artist who created that work is taking issue with a newer, larger version. 

Call it Duckie v. Duckie.

NOAA

The more rain we have this spring, the bigger the Lake Erie algae bloom this summer -- and it’s been a wet spring.

Algae blooms in western Lake Erie are primarily due to excess nutrients from fertilizer chemicals running off farm land.  Some blooms can become toxic, shutting down beaches or sickening people and pets.

Rain helps phosphorus travel from farms to the lake through rivers including the Maumee in western Ohio – and tracking from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration can predict the size of an algae bloom.

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

The U.S. EPA has approved Ohio’s list of impaired waters, a disappointment to environmental groups that filed a lawsuit against the agency last month.

Ohio’s list did not include the open waters of western Lake Erie – and groups including the National Wildlife Federation said that was a serious omission.

In a statement, the Federation’s Frank Szollosi said the federal agency's decision to approve Ohio’s list without the open waters prolongs Lake Erie’s problems.

Big cities struggling to connect with Great Lakes

May 22, 2017
Matt Richmond, ideastream

Cleveland, which sits on Lake Erie, has big plans for its waterfront. But the city faces some major obstacles – like highways and railroad tracks.

The question for Cleveland and many other Great Lakes cities is: How do you retrofit an old industrial giant?


Courtesy of Cleveland Water Alliance

The Erie Hack competition is over, with $40,000 and consulting services awarded to Micro Buoy, a team from Wayne State University in Detroit. 

The team’s idea is a nano-sensor that can be attached to a buoy that will be able to detect temperature, lead, and nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen. 

Pages