Invasive Species

Credit US Department of Agriculture

The Great Lakes ecosystem has been severely damaged by more than 180 invasive and non-native species. Species such as the sea lamprey, zebra mussel and alewife degrade habitat, out-compete native species and damage the fishing industry.

Ways to Connect

Illinois Dept of Natural Resources

Great Lakes Today reporter Elizabeth Miller appeared on WVIZ/PBS program Ideas to discuss the release of a new study from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 

The report details new measures -- including electric barriers, noise and an engineered channel -- to prevent Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes. 

USACE

In a long-awaited report, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says new measures are needed to prevent Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes.

The report says the current defense at the Brandon Road lock in Illinois – an underwater electric barrier – should be beefed up. The Army Corps' recommended plan would add water jets and complex noises – like the underwater recordings of a boat motor. 


by Angelica A. Morrison / Labatts USA and Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper announce partnership

A new series of environmental events focused on clearing invasive plants will begin this summer in the Buffalo area.

The Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper and Labatt USA are hosting several cleanup events centered around Times Beach on Lake Erie and Seneca Bluffs on the Buffalo River. The river empties into the eastern end of Lake Erie.

In addition to clearing debris, volunteers will help remove invasives, Riverkeeper Executive Director Jill Jedlicka says.

Angelica Morrison

President Trump's budget priorities have put funding for the Great Lakes in danger.

His 2018 budget outline eliminated $300 million in annual funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, which has backed hundreds of projects on pollution, invasive species and other topics. For a while, it looked like he might also grab $50 million in initiative funds in the current budget.

But at least the $50 million is safe.

For years, the folks who protect the Great Lakes have warned about the dangers of ballast water discharges -- because they can carry invasive species. Now a study by Michigan State researchers shows that ballast water also can contain viruses dangerous to wildlife and humans, Great Lakes Echo reports.

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