History

For centuries, the Great Lakes have served as an important food source and trade route for people living along their shore. Today, that rich history is a draw for tourists as well as divers interested in the lakes' thousands of shipwrecks. 

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Draken Harald Hårfagre

The replica Viking ship Draken Harald Hårfagre has sailed out of the Great Lakes, wrapping up a contentious visit.

The 115-foot Norwegian vessel sailed across the Atlantic Ocean this spring and toured Canadian and U.S. waters all summer. It made stops in Chicago, Detroit and Green Bay, where visitors came aboard for tours.

But the Draken has no plans to return to the Great Lakes.

Ben Thorp

Alpena, Mich. -- The research vessel Storm sits in the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary -- in water is so clear you can just make out the bottom. Divers prep their gear on deck and then sink into the waters of Lake Huron.

In roughly a minute, they’re at the bottom of an 80-foot sinkhole. Down there, with almost no oxygen and a large amount of sulfate seeping up through the ground, it’s a perfect place for microbes to gather in layers along rocks. They form one of earth’s strangest organisms: microbial mats.

PHOTO: LBJ Presidential Library / PHOTO: LBJ Presidential Library

As a new president prepares to take office, this is a time to reflect on his power to bring significant change to the Great Lakes. A look back at this story from Great Lakes Today raises the question: How will Donald Trump's environmental legacy compare to LBJ's

 


Elizabeth MIller

Heavy winds didn’t stop the hundreds gathered to watch the Port Clinton lighthouse make a half-mile journey down the Portage River to its new home on Lake Erie. The 120-year-old lighthouse has been an enduring symbol for Port Clinton, a town west of Cleveland. 
 

Fans followed the path of the 12,000-pound lighthouse Tuesday as it traveled by boat and truck, lifted by a crane three times. It had been sitting for more than 50 years at a nearby marina. 

Jim Kennard

Rochester-based explorers say they have discovered the Washington, a sloop that sank more than 200 years ago off the coast of Oswego, N.Y.

Jim Kennard , Roger Pawlowski and Roland Stevens located the ship, which sank in November, 1803, and is the second oldest wreck discovered in Lake Ontario.

Kennard and his team used sonar technology and a remotely operated vehicle to locate the sloop.

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