Farming

Great Lakes agriculture generates more than $15 billion a year and it accounts for 7 percent of total U.S. food production. But fertilizer runoff from farm fields is a major source of pollution in the lakes.

Ways to Connect

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

On the Atwater Farm, a commercial dairy farm near Lake Ontario, the sound of diesel trucks thunders through the air as they bring in loads of harvested corn for cow feed. 


Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority

Each year, ports on the Great Lakes dredge tons of material to keep shipping lanes open. But disposing of the spoils is a big problem. The Port of Toledo has a creative approach: farming.

The Port of Toledo dredges more sediment than any port on the Great Lakes – up to a million cubic yards every year.  The idea of reusing sediment as soil for agriculture is new for the Great Lakes region and ideal for Lake Erie’s western basin.

Algae Bloom forecast for the Great Lakes

Jul 8, 2016

There is some good news in store for the Great Lakes. A federal agency said Thursday morning that forecasts show the western side of Lake Erie will experience a less severe algae bloom this year.

Summers along the Great Lakes include fishing, boating -- and dangerous algae blooms that can shut down beaches. These blooms are caused by excess phosphorous, a lot of which comes from farms. Now some of the region's farmers are testing agricultural practices that could reduce harmful runoff.


Environmental and state leaders in New York are calling on Ohio to get its phosphorous run-off into Lake Erie under control.

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