Farming

Great Lakes agriculture generates more than $15 billion a year and it accounts for 7 percent of total U.S. food production. But fertilizer runoff from farm fields is a major source of pollution in the lakes.

Ways to Connect

Researchers are refining a system to predict the strength and movement of harmful algae blooms that plague Lake Erie during the summer. The blooms can be dangerous -- fouling beaches and threatening drinking water, especially at the western end of the lake. 

Nick Castele/ideastream

In just a few weeks, we’ll have a new presidential administration – and that could mean big changes for the Great Lakes.

Environmental groups are waiting to see how Donald Trump's administration handles issues that are crucial to the region.

Elizabeth MIller

This week, representatives from organizations all over the Great Lakes met in Sandusky, Ohio, to grapple with the region's future. Harmful algae blooms, water quality and working with diverse communities were among the topics featured in panel discussions and sessions.

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

On the Atwater Farm, a commercial dairy farm near Lake Ontario, the sound of diesel trucks thunders through the air as they bring in loads of harvested corn for cow feed. 


Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority

Each year, ports on the Great Lakes dredge tons of material to keep shipping lanes open. But disposing of the spoils is a big problem. The Port of Toledo has a creative approach: farming.

The Port of Toledo dredges more sediment than any port on the Great Lakes – up to a million cubic yards every year.  The idea of reusing sediment as soil for agriculture is new for the Great Lakes region and ideal for Lake Erie’s western basin.

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