Technology

Dr. Rafat Ansari

Algae blooms continue to color western Lake Erie a deep green. Now researchers and scientists want to know more about toxins produced by the algae -- and they’re getting help from some unlikely sources.


Courtesy of Cleveland Water Alliance

The Erie Hack competition is over, with $40,000 and consulting services awarded to Micro Buoy, a team from Wayne State University in Detroit. 

The team’s idea is a nano-sensor that can be attached to a buoy that will be able to detect temperature, lead, and nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen. 

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

Great Lakes Today's feature on Erie Hack, a regional technology competition, was featured on NPR's All Things Considered Monday.  

Reporter Elizabeth Miller highlighted a team of University of Akron scientists who made it to the finals of the competition.  The team, called Water Warriors, created an educational kit that helps students analyze water samples.

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

Pollution and other problems plague areas all over the Great Lakes region. And they can make drinking or swimming dangerous.  There’s plenty of blame to go around for this – city water utilities, agriculture, and politicians to name a few.

Now an unlikely industry has joined the search for solutions -- technology is taking on Lake Erie.