Science

Dogs sniff out pollution along Great Lakes

Sep 26, 2016
Rebecca Thiele

In the town of Bridgman, Mich., investigators Sable and Kenna sniff samples from storm water drains near a beach. Sable is a 10-year-old German Shepherd. Kenna, a Golden Retriever, is 2.


Irene Miles, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant

If you're a Great Lakes geek, you've got to love @twoyellowbuoys on Twitter.  The cheeky account is loaded with data and photos courtesy of a pair of buoys stationed on Lake Michigan by Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant. We wanted to know more about the buoys -- Michigan City and Wilmette -- so we asked them for an interview. They managed to squeeze it in between taking measurements and enjoying the sunsets.

Ben Thorp

Alpena, Mich. -- The research vessel Storm sits in the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary -- in water is so clear you can just make out the bottom. Divers prep their gear on deck and then sink into the waters of Lake Huron.

In roughly a minute, they’re at the bottom of an 80-foot sinkhole. Down there, with almost no oxygen and a large amount of sulfate seeping up through the ground, it’s a perfect place for microbes to gather in layers along rocks. They form one of earth’s strangest organisms: microbial mats.

Pages