Pollution

Elizabeth Miller

A big threat to the Great Lakes comes from outdated sewer systems that can carry bacteria into waterways.  That can lead to closed beaches and warnings about drinking water. Now, some cities are fighting back – with trees.


Dogs sniff out pollution along Great Lakes

Sep 26, 2016
Rebecca Thiele

In the town of Bridgman, Mich., investigators Sable and Kenna sniff samples from storm water drains near a beach. Sable is a 10-year-old German Shepherd. Kenna, a Golden Retriever, is 2.


Elizabeth MIller

This week, representatives from organizations all over the Great Lakes met in Sandusky, Ohio, to grapple with the region's future. Harmful algae blooms, water quality and working with diverse communities were among the topics featured in panel discussions and sessions.

Elizabeth MIller

Each summer, many beaches along the Great Lakes are shut down because the waters have high bacteria levels.  But figuring out exactly when to close a beach is difficult, and scientists are trying out a new test that could lead to safer swimming.


The U.S. and Canada announced Wednesday that they have finalized a plan for restoring and protecting Lake Superior's water quality.

A 96-page document from the Lake Superior Partnership outlines major threats such as invasive species and climate change. It also lists priorities for preserving the relatively clean waters, including ending the release of nine toxic substances.

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