Pollution

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

Pollution and other problems plague areas all over the Great Lakes region. And they can make drinking or swimming dangerous.  There’s plenty of blame to go around for this – city water utilities, agriculture, and politicians to name a few.

Now an unlikely industry has joined the search for solutions -- technology is taking on Lake Erie.


by Angelica A. Morrison / Great Lakes Today

The International Joint Commission, the bi-national group that helps to oversee the Great Lakes, held two public meetings in Buffalo on Tuesday – and more than 200 people showed up to share their concerns.


More than 100 scientists gathered recently at the University of Windsor in Ontario to discuss Lake Erie's  somewhat fragile health. And keynote speaker Dr. Jeff Reutter delivered a sober warning about proposals to dismantle the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Researchers are refining a system to predict the strength and movement of harmful algae blooms that plague Lake Erie during the summer. The blooms can be dangerous -- fouling beaches and threatening drinking water, especially at the western end of the lake. 

Ben Thorp

Residents near an abandoned military base in Michigan are worried about an unseen invader: toxic chemicals that have contaminated wells in the town of Oscoda. Now the chemicals are spreading farther -- and have even reached Lake Huron.


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