Niagara Falls

Paul Pasquarello, N.Y. Power Authority

It's an annual tradition in the Great Lakes: setting up an ice boom across the eastern end of Lake Erie. 

The boom -- a series of pontoons that stretches nearly two miles -- is designed to cut down on ice jams that could damage properties and the hydroelectric power plant intakes along the Niagara River.

Dave Rosenthal

Capt. Rod MacDonald has been piloting Niagara Falls tour boats for 29 years. He's seen a lot on the Maid of the Mist -- from anniversary celebrations to fatal jumps over Horseshoe Falls.

But some things stay the same: He wants his passengers to experience the falls up close. And he wants to keep them safe amid the swirling, churning waters. 

Maid of the Mist

Niagara Falls, N.Y., has a messy problem -- it continues to dump sewage and discolored water downriver from the popular tourist attraction. The most recent incident happened Wednesday afternoon.


by Dave Rosenthal / Capt. Rod MacDonald on the Maid of the Mist

On most summer days, you’ll find Capt. Rod MacDonald in the Maid of the Mist wheelhouse. It’s a few steps up from the top deck and the hundreds of tourists in blue rain slickers.


Twitter/@MaidOfTheMist

Local officials say human error triggered the smelly black blob that appeared recently near the world-famous Niagara Falls.

In a lengthy statement, the Niagara Falls Water Board says the problem arose as a sedimentation basin was cleaned on July 29. An employee monitoring the operation was called away -- and returned to find that the water being pumped out was discolored.

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