Environment

ANGELICA A. MORRISON

Canada's Royal Botanical Gardens sit near the western end of Lake Ontario, just a short drive from the U.S. border. When the weather is warm, visitors come to see acres of gardens with roses, lilacs and other collections in bloom.

In the winter, it’s much quieter. But scientists stay busy, protecting wetlands from destructive carp. And they're using an unusual weapon: Christmas trees.


The USS Little Rock, a Navy ship that was commissioned in Buffalo in December, is still waiting for a clear path to the ocean. And it may be mid-March before the ship can leave Montreal, where it waits in port.


Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

On Lake Superior, wolves and their prey are starring in a pair of life-or-death dramas. 

On a Canadian island, wolves threaten to wipe out a once-strong herd of caribou -- triggering rescue efforts. Across the lake, on the U.S. side, the decline of a wolf pack has led to a skyrocketing moose population -- and pleas to import more wolves.  

Last part of a series on environmental justice issues in the Great Lakes region.

At the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve, about 10 men are gathered in a classroom in the Haudenosaunee community center.  The older men are teaching about traditions – on this day, a funeral ritual.  But soon, Leroy Hill shifts the conversation to a new topic: water.

 “Is there anybody here who don’t have to either buy water or get it hauled?” Hill asks.

by ANGELICA A. MORRISON

Part 2 in a series on environmental justice in the Great Lakes region.

At a pediatric clinic located in one of the poorest sections of Buffalo, 7-year-old asthmatic Victor Small sits with his mother Laticka.


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