Energy

Nuclear plant shutdown divides Great Lakes community

Apr 12, 2017
Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Great Lakes beaches have always been popular for tourists. But in the 1970s and 80s, they were also prime real estate for nuclear power plants because there was lots of water to cool the reactors.

Now there are nine nuclear plants on the U.S. side of the lakes -- but cheaper energy sources are forcing some to shut down. And in one Michigan town, residents are divided about a shutdown.

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies.

The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change.

It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change.

In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency.

President-elect Donald Trump says environmental regulations are stifling the U.S. economy. He has vowed to roll back some of those rules, and he's also taken aim at the international climate agreement signed in Paris last year.

Now, environmentalists are getting ready to fight back. Some are soliciting donations by invoking an inevitable legal battle. And environmental attorneys are preparing their defense.

WBFO file photo

Donald Trump's election victory came with plenty of support from the Great Lakes region -- unofficial returns show him winning five of the eight states.

But in the aftermath of the election, environmental advocates were trying to determine how his presidency will affect the region, especially in light of his pledge to defund the Environmental Protection Agency.

The Ohio Air National Guard plans to build a wind turbine to generate energy for a camp near Lake Erie, but groups involved with protecting birds want to stop that plan.

Operated by the National Guard, Camp Perry sits on the shore of Lake Erie in Port Clinton.  And the proposed wind turbine would be about 10 miles from the Black Swamp Bird Observatory, home to many migrating birds. It’s also the host for an event called “Biggest Week in American Birding”.

Michael Hutchins of the American Bird Conservancy says that’s a problem.

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