Economy

Matthew Richmond/ideastream

Over the past two winters, there wasn’t much ice cover on the Great Lakes. That changed with this month’s deep freeze.


A new year brings new opportunities for recreation and commercial interests along the Great Lakes. It also means seven gubernatorial elections in states that border the lakes, and growing concern over climate change.

Great Lakes Today asked environmental groups and others for their thoughts on 2017 -- and what’s to come in the new year. One issue stood out: the wide gap between regional interests and the Trump administration. 

Elizabeth Miller

Flooding along Lake Ontario. A sunken ship. Eerie waves. A dissected Asian carp. All images from a memorable 2017 -- and part of Great Lakes Today reporting that ranged from Montreal to Duluth. Take a look at our favorite photos of the year. 

What was the biggest Great Lakes story of 2017 -- and what concerns do you have for 2018? Fill out our quick survey, and help us chronicle a tumultuous year. 

 

 

Fill out the survey.

 

Please answer the four questions by Friday, Dec. 29. Responses will be incorporated in an upcoming story.

The past year was loaded with turmoil for the Great Lakes. A new president tried to cut $300 million in  restoration projects. Homes were flooded along Lake Ontario. And one of the scariest invasive species -- the Asian carp -- was found less than 10 miles from Lake Michigan.

Here's a look at some of the biggest stories that Great Lakes Today brought you -- from New York to Minnesota, as well as the provinces of Quebec and Ontario. 

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