Asian Carp

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

There's no shortage of theories for stopping the Asian carp's move toward the Great Lakes. Big gates, underwater electric barriers, annoying sound -- all have been used or talked about as solutions.

Now, add bubbles. That was the winning idea from "Carp Tank," a $500,000 competition that wrapped up in Michigan this week.

Chuck Quirmbach

A $275 million plan to keep Asian carp from reaching Lake Michigan -- and the Great Lakes system -- drew both criticism and praise at a hearing in Chicago.

Shutterstock/Vladimir Wrangel

Researchers recently announced the discovery of over 7,000 grass carp eggs in a Lake Erie tributary.  The good news? This isn’t the Asian carp species we’re trying to prevent from entering the Great Lakes.  The bad news? Grass carp pose a different threat. 

Asian carp is a catch-all term for four different species of invasive carp: black, grass, silver, and bighead. 

Illinois Dept of Natural Resources

Great Lakes Today reporter Elizabeth Miller appeared on WVIZ/PBS program Ideas to discuss the release of a new study from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 

The report details new measures -- including electric barriers, noise and an engineered channel -- to prevent Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes. 

USACE

In a long-awaited report, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says new measures are needed to prevent Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes.

The report says the current defense at the Brandon Road lock in Illinois – an underwater electric barrier – should be beefed up. The Army Corps' recommended plan would add water jets and complex noises – like the underwater recordings of a boat motor.