Veronica Volk

Great Lakes Today Reporter/Producer

Veronica was born and raised on the New Jersey shore, where she was exposed to issues affecting coastal communities. In 2014, she traded the salt water for fresh water when she moved within 10 miles of the shores of Lake Ontario. Now based at WXXI in Rochester, N.Y., she previously worked as senior producer of the weekly public affairs show Cityscape at WFUV Public Radio, the station of alma mater Fordham University.

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Veronica Volk

For a lot of people and business around Lake Ontario, flooding put summer on hold. Now that the water is going down, businesses are coming back, including an amusement park on one of Toronto's harbor islands.


Ben Thorp

Despite a White House proposal to eliminate $300 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, the House Appropriations Committee voted late Tuesday to fully fund the program through September 2018.

The vote marks an important step toward securing funding for the Great Lakes cleanup program in the federal budget for the next fiscal year.

Veronica Volk / Great Lakes Today

Flooding along Lake Ontario is still causing problems in Toronto, the biggest city in Canada, particularly for the picturesque harbor islands.


Alex Crichton / WXXI News

The US Army Corps of Engineers predicts that water across the Great Lakes will remain high for the duration of summer, and even into the fall.

The Corps says these high levels are due to above average precipitation on the lakes. Forecasted levels on Superior, Michigan-Huron, and Erie will be the highest since the 1990s.

Lake Ontario levels will also remain high, after setting a record for highest average lake levels for the month of May. 

Communities along Lake Ontario -- ranging from Toronto to tiny Sodus Point, N.Y. -- have seen flooding for weeks.

WXXI News

Lake Ontario is currently more than two and a half feet above average for this time of year, and communities around the lake are still experiencing extreme flooding and erosion. People in communities like Sodus Point in New York are still unable to return to their homes, and beaches like Durand Beach in Rochester New York are nearly completely disappeared and closed until further notice.

In response to this flooding, the International Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River Board has decided to keep outflows high.

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