Elizabeth Miller

Great Lakes Today Reporter/Producer

Elizabeth grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and remembers camping with her family and searching for beach glass during childhood trips to the Lake Erie islands. She joined ideastream after a stint at NPR headquarters in Washington D.C., where she was an intern on the National Desk, pitching stories about everything from a gentrified Brooklyn deli to an app for lost dogs. Before that, she covered weekend news at WAKR in Akron. Elizabeth graduated from Baldwin Wallace University. 

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Summers along the Great Lakes include fishing, boating -- and dangerous algae blooms that can shut down beaches. These blooms are caused by excess phosphorous, a lot of which comes from farms. Now some of the region's farmers are testing agricultural practices that could reduce harmful runoff.


When the Cuyahoga River caught fire on June 22, 1969, it badly scarred Cleveland’s image.  Some other polluted rivers were burning in American cities, but Cleveland’s fire was highlighted in Time magazine.  The river and city became the butt of jokes -- and the inspiration for a Randy Newman tune. But today, a new generation is embracing the “Burning River” name. 

Security and rescue operations on Great Lakes waters are changing. The U.S. Coast Guard is planning to temporarily shut down eight Coast Guard stations around the Great Lakes. It’s the beginning of a larger transition aimed at improving the efficiency of stations around the nation. But Ashtabula, Ohio, doesn’t want to see its Coast Guard unit go. 


This month, the Ohio EPA could place the western Lake Erie basin on its impaired list, a biennial list of waters that do not meet state water quality standards. And with harmful algal blooms posing a threat to drinking and recreational waters every summer, advocates say there’s a clear need to clean up Lake Erie.  But is the impaired designation the solution?


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