Elizabeth Miller

Great Lakes Today Reporter/Producer

Elizabeth grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and remembers camping with her family and searching for beach glass during childhood trips to the Lake Erie islands. She joined ideastream after a stint at NPR headquarters in Washington D.C., where she was an intern on the National Desk, pitching stories about everything from a gentrified Brooklyn deli to an app for lost dogs. Before that, she covered weekend news at WAKR in Akron. Elizabeth graduated from Baldwin Wallace University. 

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Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

Scientists predict a significant harmful algae bloom for western Lake Erie this year.

The forecast, a joint effort between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Heidelberg University and other partners, predicts a bloom severity of six on a 10-point scale. That would be better than last year, but worse than 2016.

NOAA GLERL

An algae bloom was identified in Lake Erie’s central basin this week, causing increased testing and increased caution at Cleveland’s beaches.

Toxin concentrations were high only one day last week. On Friday, the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District detected a concentration of 10 parts per billion at Edgewater Beach. Ohio’s recreational threshold is 6 parts per billion.

Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

Lisa Kenion lives in Euclid, Ohio, right off of Lake Erie. She’s a member of the Moss Point Beach Club, a neighborhood with a private little patch of lakefront property.

“Every Friday night, if the weather is good in the summer, there’s a group of people that come down and we watch the sunset together,” Kenion said.

But a recent storm threatened the beach club’s lakefront oasis.


Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

It’s a special time of year for migratory birds.

Tired from their travels, they stop on the coast of western Lake Erie and spend some time resting and refueling with some food – primarily insects.

Nine years ago, the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in Ohio decided to capitalize on this event, and since then it has drawn thousands of birders from all 50 states and 52 countries.


Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

The Cuyahoga River has come a long way from that infamous 1969 fire – and it’s getting better every day.

Along with three other rivers in Ohio, the Cuyahoga is on the U.S. EPA’s Area of Concern List, which includes places hurt by industry and development. The river has 10 problem areas or impairments – loss of fish habitat and fish population, among others.

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