Elizabeth Miller

Great Lakes Today Reporter/Producer

Elizabeth grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and remembers camping with her family and searching for beach glass during childhood trips to the Lake Erie islands. She joined ideastream after a stint at NPR headquarters in Washington D.C., where she was an intern on the National Desk, pitching stories about everything from a gentrified Brooklyn deli to an app for lost dogs. Before that, she covered weekend news at WAKR in Akron. Elizabeth graduated from Baldwin Wallace University. 

Ways to Connect

Elizabeth Miller

It’s been a year of natural disasters in the U.S., with wildfires on the west coast, hurricanes in the south – and even flooding along Lake Ontario.  Are hospitals prepared to deal with extreme weather and other impacts of climate change?    


It may be hard to imagine a composer being inspired by public hearings and court cases. But Lake Erie and its problems take center stage in a new oratorio from Cleveland composer Margaret Brouwer.


Elizabeth Miller/ideastream

The 2017 algae bloom is over in western Lake Erie.  And while it didn’t directly threaten drinking water, its bright green hue prompted national attention and hurt Lake Erie’s tourism business. 


Over the years, billions of dollars have been allocated to restoring the Great Lakes – whether its money spent cleaning up pollution, preventing invasive species, or educating the public.  A new regional initiative will analyze how effective some of these efforts – and dollars – have been so far. 


The Maumee River runs more than 100 miles before emptying into Lake Erie in Ohio. And it carries a lot of the farm runoff that triggers algae blooms.  But a new book explains that there’s more to the river.

Ryan Schnurr spent a week walking and canoeing the length of the river last summer.

He has turned that experience into a book called In the Watershed.  It’s part memoir and part lesson on the Maumee’s place in history.

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