Elizabeth Miller

Great Lakes Today Reporter/Producer

Elizabeth grew up in Columbus, Ohio, and remembers camping with her family and searching for beach glass during childhood trips to the Lake Erie islands. She joined ideastream after a stint at NPR headquarters in Washington D.C., where she was an intern on the National Desk, pitching stories about everything from a gentrified Brooklyn deli to an app for lost dogs. Before that, she covered weekend news at WAKR in Akron. Elizabeth graduated from Baldwin Wallace University. 

Ways to Connect

Last part of a series on environmental justice issues in the Great Lakes region.

At the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve, about 10 men are gathered in a classroom in the Haudenosaunee community center.  The older men are teaching about traditions – on this day, a funeral ritual.  But soon, Leroy Hill shifts the conversation to a new topic: water.

 “Is there anybody here who don’t have to either buy water or get it hauled?” Hill asks.

Bill Nehez/CSU Cleveland Memory Project

Part 1 in a series on environmental justice issues in the Great Lakes region.

Would you want an industrial waste dump near your house? Probably not. But across the country, environmental hazards like waste dumps tend to be located near minority communities.


Sunsets. A new beach house at Cleveland's Edgewater Beach. And Dan Egan’s book, “The Death and Life of the Great Lakes.”

These were a few of your favorite things last year, according to the results of a Listening Project survey by WCPN/ideastream. 

Matthew Richmond/ideastream

Over the past two winters, there wasn’t much ice cover on the Great Lakes. That changed with this month’s deep freeze.


A new year brings new opportunities for recreation and commercial interests along the Great Lakes. It also means seven gubernatorial elections in states that border the lakes, and growing concern over climate change.

Great Lakes Today asked environmental groups and others for their thoughts on 2017 -- and what’s to come in the new year. One issue stood out: the wide gap between regional interests and the Trump administration. 

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