Dave Rosenthal

Great Lakes Today Managing Editor

Dave is new to the Great Lakes area, but has many fond memories of vacations on another large body of water: Long Island Sound. He is the former investigations editor for The Baltimore Sun. There, he led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors breaking news award. Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

Ways to Connect

Chris Caya, WBFO News

As communities along the Great Lakes reclaim land once dominated by industry, officials are facing a daunting decision: How much land should be preserved as open space? 

In Cleveland, a developer has proposed an outlet mall along Lake Erie, near the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. In Rochester, the city has considered building housing and a hotel on Lake Ontario's shore. In Chicago, plans by Star Wars creator George Lucas to build an art museum along Lake Michigan crumbled this summer amid legal challenges.

On Tuesday, governors of the eight Great Lakes states approved a precedent-setting request by a Wisconsin city to take water from one of the lakes. The request sparked months of controversy.

To mark New York's Invasive Species Awareness Week, we asked Andrea Locke of Buffalo State to answer some questions on the issue. As Coordinator of the Western New York Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management office, she has all the answers.

This week, a decision is expected in a fight along the Great Lakes. Waukesha, Wisc., wants to draw water from the lakes. No one's ever made a request like that, and some worry that more will follow. Great Lakes Today Managing Editor Dave Rosenthal discusses the issue with Susan Bence of WUWM in Milwaukee.

New at Canalside: a "Cool Globes" public art exhibition. The 12 sculptures offer messages for people and businesses to take action on climate change.

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said in a news release announcing the installation, “New York has led the nation on climate change and this project highlights our continued commitment to protecting our planet for future generations."

The globes will be on display until November.

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